Stakeholder
Network
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World Health Organization
The World Health Organization (WHO) represents perhaps the largest network for snakebite issues. WHO developed a roadmap to tackle Neglected Tropical Diseases through which snakebite envenoming (SBE) has received considerable support since being officially recognized as a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) in 2018. This led to the development and launch, in May 2019, of their official snakebite strategy document; ‘Snakebite Envenoming – A Strategy for Prevention and Control.
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Eswatini Antivenom Foundation

Eswatini Anitvenom Foundation (EAF) aims to raise funds to treat snakebite victims in Eswatini. Snakebites are a disease of circumstance and poverty. Eswatini (formerly known as Swaziland), located in Southern Africa, is especially affected by snakebites. An abundance of dangerous venomous snakes and a stretched medical budget can manifest into a serious snakebite problem. EAF aims to raise funds to treat snake bite victims who are among the poor in society.

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Kenya Wildlife Service
In the case of Kenya, The Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) is a state corporation established in 1989 and is in charge of the conservation and management of the country's flora and fauna. Kenya is endowed with a vast range of biodiversity, with over 39 designated national parks and reserves, however, due to various factors such as urbanisation and industrialisation, among other reasons, there has been increased encroachment and poaching to supply the demand for land and economic needs and thus increased human-wildlife conflicts. The role that KWS plays is vital in the work carried out by the K-SRIC team.
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Global Snakebite Initiative

The Global Snakebite Initiative (GSI) is an Australian based, registered non-profit, charitable organization. The initiative's primary objectives are geared towards prevention, understanding, and treatment of snakebites and the improvement of outcomes for snakebite victims in developing countries. It aims to give a voice to snakebite victims as Snakebites 

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Snakebite Healing & Education Society
Snakebite Healing and Education Society (SHE) has been founded to address the challenges associated with snakebite in India by engaging experts from different fields. Snakebite expert doctors, Human Rights activists, Scientists, Herpetologists, Lawyers, NGO partners and administrators all form a part of the advisory board and shall help spur this issue into a movement with a unified voice.
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Madras Crocodile Bank/
Centre for Herpetology 

The Madras Crocodile Bank Trust was established in 1976 with the specific goal of securing breeding populations of the three species of Indian crocodile which were all critically endangered. Known as the Madras Crocodile Bank Trust and Center for Herpetology since 2003, The Croc Bank is as much a field based conservation outfit as it is a collection of captive animals for safekeeping. A young and dynamic management team now leads the main operation spurring on exciting new changes. The Croc Bank Masterplan will soon come into action and there is plenty of excitement in store.

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Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)
Snakebite has always been low on the public health agenda at national and international levels. More than 20,000 people die from snakebites each year in sub-Saharan Africa alone, where MSF treat several thousand victims of snakebite every year and witness the devastating impact of snakebites on victims, their families and communities in many of the places we work. Access to proper treatment is limited, with quality antivenoms costing several times the yearly salary of a farmer in South Sudan, for example - a population that is particularly affected.
International Society on Toxinology

The International Society on Toxinology was founded in 1962 by a group of scientists and clinicians interested in advancing the science of toxinology, including basic toxin research, applied toxin research such as applications of toxins as research tools or scaffolds for new drug development, epidemiology of toxin-induced-diseases, and clinical effects of toxins and the treatment of associated diseases. The Society has supported toxinology research through regular scientific congresses, the official Society journal, Toxicon, and individual efforts by many members to advise and mentor others undertaking toxinology-related studies.

Other stakeholders.