Our

Strategy.

Antibody
engineering
.

Consortium researchers will isolate antibodies from animals after exposure to snake venom, as well as multiply envenomed surviving patients. They will identify antibodies that can bind and neutralize a variety of venom types from the most medically important snakes of Africa and India.

Research partners in SRPNTS will then engineer these antibodies for efficient manufacturing. Lead antibody candidates will be tested for efficacy in animals in preclinical studies. Eventually, the most potent mAbs may advance to clinical testing in humans.

 

Lessons from HIV R&D.

Instrumental in this effort to translate discovery science to effective treatment is the IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center (NAC) at Scripps Research. This global network of researchers and many others have discovered and characterized more than 200 bNAbs against HIV. Several of these antibodies are being developed for use in potential HIV prevention and treatment products. The NAC’s antibody discovery platform has great promise for other disease areas, and the team hypothesizes that, as with HIV variants, variants within a snake toxin type share common characteristics that are targets for antibody neutralization.

 

Outputs.

SRPNTS Workflow

SRPNTS workflow (click to enlarge)

Toxin
Characterization.

1.

Most pathogenic toxin targets for African and Indian snakes identified and produced.

Disaggregated by:

  1. Necrosis

  2. Anticoagulant

  3. Neurotoxic

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Narrow down the most pathogenic toxin targets to <10 targets (2020)

Antibody
Discovery.

Broadly protective antibodies against venom from diverse snake species discovered and developed.

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Isolation of up to 500 different monoclonal antibodies that inhibit any of the 7 representative toxin families (2021)

2.

Political and Civil Support.

3.

Information and knowledge generated by SRPNTS contributing to political and civil society support for next-generation snakebite therapies (NGSTs).

Disaggregated by:

  1. Policy

  2. Investments in NGST

  3. Future scientists in snakebite research

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Production and dissemination of policy and scientific & technical reports & open access publications (2022)

Capacity Development.

Clinical and scientific capacity building enhanced
for sustained snakebite research and evaluation
capabilities in LMICs.

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Independent research programs established at LMIC partner sites (2022)

4.

 

Impact milestones.

Completed draft of optimal target product profile for use of NGSTs in treatment of snakebite.

2021

2021

Clinical trial capacity established in hospitals in Kenya and Nigeria for assessing safety and treatment efficacy of NGSTs.

2022

Demonstrated proof-of-concept of recombinant monoclonal antibody treatment for snakebite in preclinical models.

2023

Uptake of policy documents by local governments and health agencies for use of NGSTs to treat snakebite.

2024

Initiated phase I trial for safety assessment of monoclonal antibody therapies for snakebite in humans.