SRPNTS.

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP FOR NEGLECTED TROPICAL SNAKEBITE.
Puff-Adder-(Kenya)--Photo-by-Simon-Towns

Discovering

New Therapies for

A Neglected Disease

SNAKEBITE.

Both a consequence and cause of tropical poverty.

The Scientific Research Partnership for Neglected Tropical Snakebite (SRPNTS), a consortium of partners in five countries, constitutes a significant investment in snakebite therapy research.

 

SRPNTS aims to treat critical illness from snake venom in sub-Saharan Africa and India - regions with the highest snakebite morbidity and mortality burden.

Scientific
Research
.

SRPNTS is pioneering new research that is contributing not only to basic understanding of venom toxicology and immune responses to venom toxins, but also focuses on translating these findings into globally accessible and affordable products.

The world produces less than half of the antivenom it needs, and this only covers 57% of the world’s species of venomous snake. Barriers to snakebite treatment are driven by challenges plaguing antivenom production and use, characterized by a 19th-century technology, first developed in 1894, which continues to have high manufacturing costs and remains unaffordable and inaccessible to the poorest people who are most in need. Moreover, multi-venom treatments commonly used in Africa and India have weak, unreliable effectiveness against the venom of any single snake species and may even have harmful side effects, such as anaphylactic shock.

The challenge.

SRPNTS brings together expert institutions in snakebite and snakebite treatment paired with antibody-technologies and capabilities developed to combat HIV/AIDS.

Our 
Strategy
.

1.

Most pathogenic toxin targets for African and Indian snakes identified and produced.

Toxin
Characterization.

Broadly protective antibodies against venom from diverse snake species discovered and developed.

Antibody
Discovery.

2.

Information and knowledge generated by SRPNTS contributing to political and civil society support for next-generation snakebite therapies (NGSTs).

Political and Civil Support.
Capacity Development.

Clinical and scientific capacity building enhanced for sustained snakebite research and evaluation capabilities in LMICs.

3.

4.

 

The consortium’s work is funded through a £9 million grant from the UK Department for International Development (DFID), now known as the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). 

UK aid has invested in research to identify the complex antibodies needed to develop affordable, accessible, effective treatments. This is a fantastic example of how UK aid can make a real difference in the world.

UK International Development Secretary

May 16, 2019

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DFID Logo.jfif
SRPNTS Annual Consortium Meeting 2019 -
 
 
Magnified Grass

Partners.

 

Snakebite.

Snakebite envenoming affects millions of people around the world.

5,400,000

Every year, approximately 5.4 million people are bitten by a snake...

2,700,000

...of whom 2.7 million are injected with venom

400,000

...which leads to 400,000 people being permanently disabled and 

138,000

...between 83,000-138,000 deaths annually, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. 

 Sobering figures that are likely an  underestimate of the true disease burden.

Learn more...

Puff Adder
Bitis arietans

This viper is Africa’s largest and is found throughout sub-Saharan Africa, commonly in rocky grasslands.

 

News & Resources.